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sequestration of the states. "washington >> mr. president, i rise with real heavy starter. our friend dan just died. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] >> a democrat of hawaii, a highly decorated wofford war two combat veteran and the second longest senator in history died on monday. the senate passed a resolution naming patrick leahy as new president pro temps, the third in line to the presidency. good morning, everyone, on this tuesday, december 18, 2012, as senators say goodbye to their longtime colleague yesterday, they will be welcoming a new senator from the state of south carolina. and tim scott has been tapped to replace jim demint. and the papers reporting progress being made about the so-called fiscal cliff talk. first, we return to the tragedy to discuss mental health issue in this country. what should be the role of the federal and state government if any in mental health? also send us a tweet, twitter.com c-spanwj or facebook .com/c-span
distinguished career in congress advocating on behalf of those voices who were often drowned out in washington by the influence of the moneyed interest. over the last 40 years, congressman stark has been one of the foremost advocates on behalf on efforts to ensure that americans were able to access quality, affordable health insurance. i am honored to have been one of the three principaled co- authors in the house of the historic affordable care act which will provide quality insurance for every single american. the key role mr. stark in drafting that law and made sure that the law provided needed relief for working families. this was a crucial accomplishment, yet it was far from mr. stark's only accomplishment in the field of health care. as a former chair and ranking democrat on the ways and means health subcommittee for many years, he was a leader on the health care reform. he was a lead author of the original cobra insurance bill which ensured that workers faced with losing their jobs would not also immediately lose access to the needed health insurance. and those of us who have gone throu
: chris joining us from philadelphia, democrats' line with representative rick larsen from washington state. caller: thank you, c-span, for what you provide the american people. i find this whole situation ironic. the fiscal cliff scares me personally -- and i think president obama certainly has shown his willingness to compromise whereas the republicans and tea party do not seem to want to do so. this ideology they are sticking to will ruin our economy and i find it hypocritical because their chief criticism of the president during the presidential campaign was his mismanagement of our economy and they are willing to mismanage our economy down the drain on some principal. it does not seem they care about the american people. they care about the part of the american people, the rich, that is what seems like to me and i am sick of it. i used to be republican and i switched party about, i guess eight or 10 years ago. which has something to do with philadelphia politics as well because you cannot have much say in philadelphia politics unless you are democrat but that is beside the point.
the alternative minimum tax is affecting fiscal negotiations. "washington journal" is next. ♪ ♪ host: 25 days to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do not think it goes far enough. i think it was greenspan that i heard last week said in a discussion panel that a rec
. host: that is a shot of the union station in weiss did, d.c. -- in washington, d.c.. we will take a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll
and politico reporters on the role of lobbyists in those negotiations. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning. both parties are reportedly still talking on the phone. as the deadline approaches, we are two weeks before christmas. eric cantor leaving open the possibility of of a post session. let's look of the numbers. the fiscal cliff deadline 22 days away. we want to begin with a look ahead at the second term agenda. in your mind, what did you think should be the number one priority. we will take your calls and comments. you can also join us on facebook and twitter. from the headlines this morning, including this from the washington post. there is also this story from "the huffington post." aspirations' including closing the educational achievement gap. the lofty goals may have to wait as lawmakers and the president toppled a number of issues that cannot wait. let's go back to the inauguration from generic 20, 2009, a few hundred feet from where we are at as he addressed the nation. he will do so again january next year. this is what he said nearly four years ago. [video
at 9:15, more about the role of social security. ♪ host: good morning. welcome to "washington journal" on this wednesday, december 12, 2012. negotiations continue over the so-called looming fiscal cliff. yesterday president obama and john boehner spoke by phone. washington post reported however that they are still working on a deal and nothing is locked down yet. we will talk more about the fiscal cliff this morning on "the washington journal." what tax deductions would you give up as part of a solution to the deficit problems? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. find a son facebook and weigh in there. at journal@c- span.org. "the christian science monitor," asked what we would be willing to give up. "americans would be willing to give up the tax deduction for charitable giving over other popular tax breaks." host: let's take a look at the results of this poll. 25% said that they would be willing to give up the charitable giving tax
lexington institute. then the latest from egypt. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: president obama and john boehner met yesterday afternoon at the white house to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. their first meeting in 23 days. both sides are not saying what if any progress were made. washington has 22 days left to me -- make a deal. "the post" had lined, "a deal is a vital." what are you willing to sacrifice to avert the so-called this clip? for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. remember, also, send us it twitter message, the analysis is that americans need to embrace sacrifice again. he says that any outcome of this is going to require sacrifice and pain from the american public. in the peace he writes that the problem is not washington, that it is us. no longer are we willing to pay for the things that we know that we need. boaters that demand something for nothing will demand otherwise. politicians who fear for their jobs will comply. we want to turn to all of you and ask you, what are you willing to sacrifice? are you
sent to washington have to do their jobs. the housing market is healing, but that could stall if folks are seeing smaller paychecks. unemployment rate is lowest it has been in 2008, but already families and businesses are starting to hold back because of the disfunction they see in washington. you meet your deadlines. you meet your responsibilities every single day. the folks you sent here to serve should do the same thing. we cannot let washington politics get in the way of america's progress. we've got to do what it takes to protect the middle class, protected economy, and move the country forward. thanks, everybody. >> i am senator roy blunt from missouri. as we bring 2012 to a close, leaders in washington have an opportunity to kick off the new year by working together to solve some of the big challenges facing our country today. at a time when our federal debts top a record $16 trillion, , the senate majority leaders refuse to bring an appropriation bills to the floor this entire year. when you fail to plan, you plan to fail. that is exactly what they have been doing. meanwhile, s
in washington. it ended with the reelection of barack obama. if you could think of adjectives, what would they be to describe these seven years? >> interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. full of opportunities for the country. there were good times during these 12 years, laced together with some that were not so good. 9/11. the anthrax scare. there were also positive things. the election of barack obama i thought was a very positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way out of a fiscal of this. abyss.thi i could not have imagined a better time to have been here with all of the things that have happened. >> let me ask you to look back over those 12 years and ask what the high point was. >> when we could work together. maybe the single event that would and body that is the gang of 14. john mccain and i put together six other democrats and six other republicans to avoid what was then called the nuclear option, changing the rules, turning the senate into a smaller version of the house, where the rights of the minority caucus are ignored. consequently, we were
many days and nights alone as i have tried to come up here and change things in washington. she's often reminded me or questioned how i thought i could change the world, when i couldn't even mow the grass. but she has been a supporter and certainly so important, as i left my children who were still in school and i began serving in the house, kept them on the right track. and i particularly want to thank them. all of you who served here know that when we sign up for public life we also sign our families up for public life. in a lot of ways it makes their lives much more difficult. so i want to thank my children, my wife, debbie, and family for putting up with this and being such a support. i also have to thank the people of south carolina who have entrusted me with this job in the senate for the last eight years and in the house six years before that. all of you know who served for your states. as you've traveled around and met people, toured businesses and spoken to groups, it really creates a deep love and appreciation for people back home. i look at what we're making in south carolina
the grand bargain that many leaders once imagined. as we take you through all the latest on the "washington journal," we would like to hear what you would like to say to congressional leaders on this 11th hour deal. what tax and spending issues do need included in any compromise. republicans, your number is -- democrats -- independents -- if you are outside the u.s. -- you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter, facebook, or e- mail us. a very good morning to you. taking to the latest headlines on the fiscal cliff. i will run a few -- through a few of them for you. from "the daily news" -- also "l.a. times" -- i will take to "a "boston globe"" -- "the boston globe" -- the new york post -- the story i want to start with this morning is from politico. that line is -- senate leaders are headed into a critical sunday session of congress with a similar mission to avoid historic tax hikes, setting the stage for a high wire a final act of fiscal cliff negotiating just two days before the country is hit with a series of tough austerity measures. -- that again is
the rules and pass h.r. 3137 to name the medical center in spokane, washington, as the mann-grandstaff medical center. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. >> a bill to name the department of veterans affairs medical center in spokane, washington, as the mann-grandstaff department of veterans affairs medical center. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from florida, mr. miller, the gentleman from maine, mr. michaud, each will control 20 minutes. members, please remove conversations from the floor. members in the aisle. mr. miller: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. miller: thank you very much, mr. speaker. h.r. 3197 would rename the medical center in spokane, the mann-grandstaff department of veterans affairs medical center. this legislation would recognize not one, but two -- the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: members, please remove conversations from the floor. remove conversation
, a reporter described where we are right now as a situation of washington post own making. -- washington's own making. how did we get where we are right now? >> on the revenue side, you go back to the bush years. when they passed the bush tax cuts, for various procedural reasons, they wanted to shoehorn as much tax-cutting as they could into a 10-year period. because of the rules, they really went overboard, did much more in the way of tax cutting and we could afford. it was very apparent at the time that they did it. they sun-setted it all after 10 years. the same is true with the so- called sequester. across-the-board cuts of $1.20 trillion, focused on domestic spending, was put in place to try to provide leverage to the special committee that if it did not reach agreement, the sequester would drop and do something that nobody favors, an across-the-board cut. no distinctions, no prioritize nation. just to cut across the board. -- prioritization. just to cut across the board. >> going back to the bush years, what is congress's role in this? >> i vigorously and energetically opposed it. i said
negotiations between capitol hill and the white house. from today's washington journal, this is about an hour. fiscal cliff. joining us here is stan collender and douglas holtz- eaken. what is happening? what are the two talking about. guest: the nature of the tax increases, how much, and on the other side, what kind of entitlement reforms as the president willing to offer? that has been going back and forth for quite awhile now. there are talking about the same basic issues. host: one of the shore signs of action in washington, we have heard there is a possibility that they could come back after christmas. guest: i have been telling clients since september we were going over the cliff. i was not sure there was a sign it or coming back before christmas. this last-minute deal of some time, it could easily be approved -- the house and senate do not need to be here for this because it will not be the big, big deal. this is not the grand compromise they are talking about here there is not enough support to do the technical things. this could be a simple package they do at the last minute. host: e
of u.s. security agents. benghazi, tripoli and washington coordinated effectively with each other on the night of the attacks. the interagency response was timely and appropriate. but there was not enough time for u.s. military forces to have made a difference. having said that, it is not reasonable nor feasible to tether u.s. forces at the ready to respond to protect every high risk post in the world. we have found that there was no immediate tactical warning of the september 11 attacks. if there was a knowledge gap in the intelligence community's en understanding of extremist militias in benghazi -- in this context, increased violence .ailed to com we did not find that any individual u.s. government employee engaged in willful misconduct or knowingly ignored his or her responsibilities. we did conclude that certain state department bureau level senior officials in critical positions of authority and responsibility in washington demonstrate a lack of leadership and management ability a program for senior ranks and their responses to security concerns posed by the special mission.
-- facebook page. the american people get it. washington is addicted to spending someone else's money. the house has passed two bills that would avert the fiscal cliff. in august to pass a bipartisan bill. the house passed legislation to avoid sequestration by cutting spending. our plan is to take your calls and hear from you over twitter, and to wait it out, to wait and hear what we hear from capitol hill. our cameras are on capitol hill and we hope to be able to give you some coverage of briefings happening on the hill. so far, the house is out and the senate will be out shortly once they finish this series of votes. and it was 12:15 eastern, writing a major setback in fiscal cliff talks. you may have heard sheila jackson lee question this. that negotiations between harry reid and mitch mcconnell suffered a major setback after republicans demanded the inclusion of a new method for calculating benefits for the package. change came from progressives to result in lower payments. part of the current negotiations on the scale down deal, they say that they gave ground on other issues, inc
companies and some countries. >> do you plan to stay in washington? >> it depends on what kind of business i can acquire. i have a beautiful wife and i want to spend more time with him and get my golf handicap down to single digits. >> have you thought about the preservation of your papers? what will you do with all that? >> i am sending most of it to indiana university. especially the autism information. i have -- the indiana historical society will get some of my papers. i hope they find a good use for them. >> when you look back over 31 years which went by very quickly, what were the best years? >> oh, gosh, there was good in all of them. the best years from my standpoint was when i was chairman. even the people who work for me said, we felt like we were accomplishing something. we were fighting the good fight. that is one of the things i hold most dear. we were able to put on the gloves, grabbed the sword, and fight for the things we thought was right. >> thank you for spending time with this reflecting back on your ears in washington. -- years in washington. >> we are asking business ow
to extend tax cuts for most americans. his remarks came as congress leaves washington without a plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. the president said he hoped any deal to avoid the fiscal cliff would also include and extension of unemployment insurance and lay this is about 7 minutes. >> good afternoon, everybody. for the last few weeks, i have been working with the leaders of both parties on a proposal to get our deficit under control, to avoid tax cuts -- to avoid tax hikes on the middle-class. and to make sure we can spur jobs and economic growth. a balanced proposal that cuts spending, but also ask the wealthiest americans to pay more, a proposal that will strengthen the middle class over the long haul, and our economy over the long haul. in the course of these negotiations, i offered to compromise with republicans in congress. i met them halfway on taxes and more than halfway on spending. today, i am still willing to get a comprehensive package done. i still believe that reducing our deficit is the right thing to do for the long-term health of our economy and the confidence of our
: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin of greed. that is what i think caused it. for myself, naca program helped us, taking us out of the ugly arm. my mortgage is $964 a month, which will allow us to stay in our home comfortably. guest: people blame things like a financial crisis on greed, but greed is not changing. it has been with us for hundreds of thousands of years. people are greedy naturally. if we design institutions assuming people are altruistic, we will get hurt. we have to assume they are greedy, and if there altruistic, we will only benefit from that. we assume that people want to live in their own home, and give people a choice, buying or rentin
. it is a process -- people think of a filibuster in "mr. smith goes to washington." i think we should have those rules in place to change it so mr. smith stays on the floor during the filibuster. it does not just run time against the senate. it does not make any sense. if somebody feels strongly enough that they want to bring the senate to a halt, they should be willing to stay there on the floor and explain why, and i think it would be self- enforcing if people would be less likely to. people look at the senate and cannot work together, cannot get anything done, and one person wants their pay to be docked. >> any other reforms or tuneups? >> if somebody put a hold on it, you could not find out who did it. secret holds on nominees. once you put a hold on them, that was it. that was wrong. we have cleaned up the rules in many different ways. you would have a 60-vote threshold to do some like that. the people back home cannot understand that. they should not accept it. >> what about the lowest point? >> as part of the affordable care at, i tried to get medicaid for the expansion of medicaid, to ta
on the poor. there's an article in today's -- in "the washington post" on december 19, job boehner's plan b would raise taxes on the poor. really? i mean, is that how you're going to balance the budget? by sticking it to people who already are in vulnerable times? this is wrong. my friends talk about the debt, the deficit, but what they don't talk about is that we have fought two wars, in iraq and afghanistan, and we haven't paid for it. all on our credit card. we send our young men and women into harm's way and we ask them and their families to sacrifice and we do nothing. we just put the bill on our credit card. a few months ago the chairman of the budget committee, mr. ryan, says about $1.3 trillion, i think he's low-balling it, but $1.3 trillion on our debt and nobody over there says a word. they all go after programs like social security and medicare and food stamps. so, mr. speaker, i ask that we defeat the previous question and if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to this rule to make in order an amendment which will allow the house to have a chance to vote on
commentator once observed the political culture in washington. some men seek power and influence in order to be somebody. real men seek power and influence in order to be a blessing. i am blessed to welcome him to address this. [applause] >> wow. man. thank you, bob. i met him when i was 23 years old in wisconsin. i was introduced to him by my mentor, jack kemp. jimmy, your family, and you for caring on the torch. quick you close your eyes, you think you are listening to -- if you close your eyes, you think you are listening to jack kemp. it is something that is really a great honor to do this, to be here. back in this room like last year, and i want to say congratulations to marco rubio on receiving this well deserved honor. [applause] now, as you may know, marco is joining an elite group of past recipients for this award. [laughter] two of us so far. i will see you at the reunion dinner. [applause] [laughter] i am sure the press will not read too much into that one. [laughter] i want to thank you all for your kind hospitality. i want to thank you, jimmy, for holding this event. wherever
was that our supporters would read this and it would spend -- especially in washington, the world's biggest record chamber -- people would get nervous and worried. when those things happen, you find everyone very generous with their advice. [laughter] the frustration was less than we be worried about where we were but other people's behavior and that it would create a disillusionment among supporters. so we spent a lot of the campaign fighting back against some of these polls. what was remarkable about this race, as looking of the data that we had, it was not how volatile it was, but how steady it was. from february through november, we were running in our own data generally a two-point to 4-point lead. we never fell behind. there was a time in september, after the conventions, we had a strong convention and they had not so strong convention, and came the famous 47% tape. we got a six-point or seven- point battleground states lead. some republican leaning voters moved away from romney. and then can the first debate, which we strategically planned a little suspense for. [laughter] >> there w
and the political class here in washington d.c. so consumed by fear and hatred of the n.r.a. and american gun owners that you're willing to accept a world where real resistence to evil monssters is alone, unarmed, school principal left to vender her life, her life to shield those children in her care? no one, no one regardless of personal, political prejudice has the right to impose that sacrifice. ladies and gentlemen, there's no national one side fits all solution to protecting our children. but do know this president see road out school emergency planning grants in last year's budget and scrapped secure our schools policing grants in next year's budget. with all the foreign aid the united states does, with all the money in the federal budget, can't we afford to put a police officer in every single school? even if they did that, politicians have no business and no authority denying us the right, the ability and the moral imperative to protect ourselves and our loved ones from harm. now the national rifle association knows there are millions of qualified active and retired police. active reserve an
with him, we will see a new political atmosphere in washington. at this point it seems like more of the same. host: from facebook -- guest: one thing i a lot about yesterday was this is really raising the question of canada to be cut? is it politically possible in this environment to get enough republicans and democrats to support a deal that the white house wants on deficit reduction? because they been to the altar so many times on this same issue, taxes, medicare, social security, defense spending, you must wonder, if there's any agreement possible. host: first, commented today from the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell, who will join his colleagues later today at the white house. [video clip] >> i told the president last night we would be happy to look at whatever he proposes. the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline. as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans are not about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats before or just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that would not be fair to the ame
, washington, d.c., most panels about iran are about the nuclear program. there's almost nothing about human rights. this sends a terrible signal to the iranian public. it means that you care about your own security. you care about the implications of the islamic republic becoming a nuclear-armed state but what happens in iran does not really matter to the washington elite. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran and i think this panel and the initiative to make the human rights issues more important sends the right signal to the iranian public, telling them that you do understand that the government which is restricting its own population can also not be trusted when it comes to its international aspirations. imagine how it would be paid to behave. concerning the role about the revolutionary guards, it has inherited the religious state, something that was discussed by the previous panel. when the ayatollah khomeini was making press -- promises to the iranian people and 1960's and 1970's, he promised the people of iraq and not democracy. he promised them justice in this world
a hand. [applause] since he came to washington with president obama in 2009, he has been a forward thinking and caring supporter of the district. to the teachers and principals of this city in this country. he has helped secure millions of dollars in funding. they helped shape innovative policies, all across the country. he is a true leader, not just in time for celebration, but in times of tragedy and sorrow. yesterday, he attended the funeral of the principle of sandy hook elementary school that lost her life protecting the children of the school. ladies and gentlemen, i am proud, thankful, and privileged to introduce arne duncan. [applause] >> i want to thank the children for their fantastic support. please give a round of applause for the work she is doing. [applause] i think she is an amazing leader, and d.c. has come a long way and has a long way to go. with her passion in her heart, she is leading the charge. this is a bittersweet day. i think it is so important on days like this and every day, that we listen to our children. savor their innocence and applaud their unquencha
this morning on "washington journal." guest: this is a recession between christmas and new year's. i do not know. maybe they should finish their work. you will see some push in the next few days to get a small deal done. viewers are fan of the process. anything that gets done needs to be done quickly before new year's to be signed into law. today is the 27. and so you have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal. the president's should land at some point. there is a 5 hour time difference. they have to figure out something. it seems likely will go over the cliff. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. som
's washington office. she's always been on the cutting edge of things that really matter. let me start off by saying i do not think there is an anti- innovation caucus. i do not think there is anybody who is opposed to innovation. it is a little bit like apple pie or rg3. let me ask you all to describe what we really mean by innovation. what are the two or three priorities we ought to really be talking about? glenn? >> let's start on that side. >> i thought you'd start on that side. >> i go to my right first. >> there are three types of innovation. one is scientific innovation that allows the second innovation which is the technology innovation, to take the underlying discovery and commercialize its, turning it into a product that can be used for consumer customers. what is equally important is how you can then take a discovery, it turned into a technology, and you can deliver it in a way that allows you to build a business that gets you a margin that can support the business. basic science innovation, technology innovations, and business model innovations are the ones we think of. google
. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 19, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable daniel webster to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has agreed to s. res. 624, relative to the death of the honorable daniel k. inouye, senator from the state of ohio. -- hawaii. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip each, to five minutes but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gent
cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka pata, and allison schwartz. i just finished getting a tour of the connects workshop. i have to say,
. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors and please chiefs. we have never, to my knowledge, had anybody who has ever created, let alone starred in movies or tv series until tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-
in putting china's legal system on the political map in washington. when i started long ago to study about china's legal system, most people who would charitable felt sorry for me. they felt i must be having a nervous breakdown -- [laughter] to throw away a career in the law on a country we could not visit and seven years after the korean war's ended, we had bad relations. american views about "red china" were very negative. i wanted to have the help of the scientific you see in analyzing the rule of law in china. i remember 1964 or 1965 in lake tahoe and comparing the soviet and chinese legal systems. i was asked to talk about law. i talked about law, courts, judges. the political scientists could not have been less interested. i was disappointed. the next day talking with the conference organizers, i made another attempt. i never mentioned law. i talked about institutions and sanctions and use all the jargon of political science. they all said, that is really fundamental. [laughter] i discovered a little bit about how to be persuasive in the world.al million -- as cheng li's recognizes i
been like. follow clifton truman daniel sunday on c-span 3. 9:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. att: this week we're looking the united states long-term energy outlook. we will use a new report that came out this week from the u.s. energy information administration that protect u.s. energy consumption out to the year 2014. adam sieminski is the administrator of the eia. missionwhat the eia's is. guest: it is one of the 14 of the independent statistical agencies here in washington. we are responsible for energy information. we are by law -- it is supposed to be unbiased and neutral in our development of energy analysis, using the debt that we collect -- data that we collect. the annual energy outlook reference case, which were published today, is not really a forecast as it is a baseline. it is built on the idea of existing law and regulation so that the public and policymakers can compare what new laws and regulations or changes in world events might mean to our baseline. host: frank verrastro doggett is vice president of the energy program at the nonprofit center fo
, it is not only vote on the ground, this is an understanding in washington why many people are here. you talk about helping syria. it is basically getting enough help, either of the aid -- enough aid to help those that have been fighting for over a year. there are many commanders that have been proven to be a very trusted people. i really do not know how much this administration tried to find the good people, because when you talk to the officials there, how do you know who was good and bad? if you start trying to find your man now, you are probably too late already. this is my last point, i personally know a couple of people who have been living in the u.s. for 20-30 years and have been financing and fighting themselves. at least they could be easy to fund, but unfortunately they always complain they could not get allegiance from the administration. >> your answer is the u.s. government should provide more support to the insurgency? he could definitely. >> in the form of? >> heavy army. >> in terms of recommendations for the administration, they need to understand time is not on their side.
the authority to reprogram funds to increase diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. in a washington where too often we see the recommendations of panels ignored or deferred, as they were for a long time on even the 9/11 commission, i think the secretarys swift action underscores how determined she is to apply the lessons of benghazi. clearly, mistakes were made. we learned of those yesterday in stark terms about the mistakes leading up to the attacks. the report makes that very clear. one of the most candid and important observations was the failure by certain leaders to see the forest through the trees. there were clear warning signs that the security situation in libya had deteriorated. going forward, it is important -- and i think it is important for all of us to think in these terms -- we need to do a better job of ensuring a free and open dialogue among ambassadors, the embassy security personnel, and officials in washington for decisions on funding and staffing levels and security. as we draw lessons, i want to be crystal clear about something else. congress also bears some responsi
the fiscal deadline could affect the defense budget. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal," we continue our look at the so- called fiscal clef and what happens if the budget cuts take place in january. jim doyle the effect on businesses. after that, charles clark looks at domestic program cuts. in more about the issue with the brookings institution. bless your e-mail, phone calls, and tweets. that is live tuesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, president obama talking about the economy and the need to reach an agreement with congress on the january fiscal deadline. he spoke at a diesel plant outside of detroit. his remarks are about 25 minutes. >> hello, redford! [applause] it is good to be back in michigan. [applause] how is everybody doing today? [applause] now, let me just start off by saying we have something in common -- both our teams lost yesterday. [laughter] i mean, i would like to come here and talk a little smack about the bears, but we didn't quite get it done. but it is wonderful to be back. it is good to see everybody in the great state of michigan. [appl
people and get beyond their pledge to a special interest lobbyist here in washington, d.c. although, frankly, i fail to see how avoiding to cut taxes violates the pledge to never raise taxes. we need to defeat the previous question. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. session: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i'd like to remind the gentleman that the republicans have already passed the bill for the middle class tax cut on august 1 of this year and passed 256-171. we are now waiting for the senate to act on that. i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves his time. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from california, the vice chairman of the democrat caucus, mr. becerra. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. becerra: i thank the gentlelady for yielding. if you're in the middle class, shouldn't it feel like you're in the middle of america? yet the politics of extremism is pushing the middle class to the very edge. the
challenged the members of our party to grapple with these issues, make tough choices. washington has a serious spending problem. this was the year, the size of our debt, all $16 trillionths of it, surpass the size of our retientire economy. but president's solution of raising tax rates would hurt jobs, at a time when for too many of our citizens are struggling to find them. i have seen the damage that higher taxes can do for jobs and families. i do not want tax rates to go up. republicans do not want tax rates to go up. the best way to address are crippling debt is to make significant spending cuts and fix our tax code, to pave the way for long-term growth and opportunity. this is an approach that most americans approve. we only run the house. democrats continued to run washington. hope springs eternal. we have it in us to come together and do the right thing. will continue to work with our colleagues in congress and the white house on a plan that protects families and small businesses. for now, i wish all the american people a blessed and mary christmas. >> on "newsmakers," represen
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
of the "washington journal." we'll see you again tomorrow morning at 7:00 eastern time. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> today on c-span, the impact of student loan debt on students and parents, followed by a look at space exploration and innovation. later, a discussion on nasa's budget and mission. >> my first conservative was a friend of a friend -- i never met a conservative in my life. i was impressed by him, because he answered questions, he was very composed. he was not rancorous. he tried to gauge his responses to the level of my request. over the course -- and not understand of anything this guy is saying, but he is so damn polite. maybe there's something in his convictions. >> playwright and reformed the mamet.al david sunday night at 11:15 eastern. "booktv." >> according to a report, the u.s. now has more student loan debt and credit card debt. next, a discussion on how to ease the debt burden on students and their families. hosted by propublica and the lower east side tenement of new york city. [applause] >
the republicans will come to roughly 4% of the $14 trillion to $15 trillion washington is on track to spend on health care in the next decade. to be precise, it is not even a cut but a restraint on the rate of growth. so if their proposal is serious but you're saying you can't go after benefits, i mean, how do we tame the entitlement program? guest: well, two things. one, the u.s. is judging it on the basis of how high the number is. so whoever has the highest number, they say $1 trillion. somebody said $2 trillion. they'd say it's, quote, more serious. i judge serious but how are you going to make the system work and be sustainable. let's say you're a company and you're on cost pressure as many companies were and you're the c.e.o. and ask your managers to give you advice on what to do. one person comes in and says, we can change the content of our product. it's going to make it inferior, but we can probably get away with it for a while and will save us money. another person says, our supply chain is not efficient. and if we change our production process this way we can improve quality and
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
. americans have a right to know the washington money -- the money washington tension there is well spent. our duty on the oversight and government reform committee is to protect these rights. our solemn responsibility is to hold the government accountable to the taxpayer. it is our job to work tirelessly in partnership with citizen watchdogs to deliver the fax to the american people and bring general reform to bureaucracy. our committee's resources are limited, in one area, we have focused for more than six years. and that is taking drugs and dangerous substances out of professional sports. we do some -- we do so for a bipartisan basis. we do so because what professional sports do is what collegiate sports do and it is what children aspire to do. we cannot take professional sports a in isolation, because ultimately it trickles down to the youngest. when we began our work on a bipartisan basis on steroids in baseball, steroids have become common at the high-school level. today i believe it is dramatically reduced but not eliminated. it in play last season. we are now finishing this season, and
trees were lit in washington, d.c. president obama and the first family participated in the 90th annual christmas tree lighting ceremony. the tradition of a national christmas tree started in 1923 with president coolidge. house speaker john boehner joins the lighting of the capitol christmas tree. this year's tree is from the colorado's white river national forest. watch both of these ceremonies tonight 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page sense of writing. but i think that there's no tha other art form so readily available other than perhaps -- inaudible just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend join book tv american history tv and c-span's local content vehicles as we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city albany. today at noon eastern on book tv on c-span and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span 3. >> next government officials and policy researchers testify about the political instability in malli. earlier in the year, malli experienced a military coup and norther
. and the more fair we are here in washington, you make more, you pay more. you make less you pay less. and i'm one of those that likes two deductions. one for charitable giving and the other for the mortgage interest dedux. we can negotiate over numbers. that's not a problem. we can compromise, we can reach an agreement, a compromise over numbers. but let's don't compromise on principle that is so basic, simply says, if you make more you pay more. it's an easy concept. you make more you pay more. you make less you pay less. that's fair. and for heaven's sake, let's do this and let's take that obamacare burden off the working poor in america that are going to get socked with that tax. and we were told for so long, if we don't do something, there will be 30 million, maybe 20 million, 30 million people in america who won't have insurance. and then we get to the bottom of it, we find out, well, now we're going to have lots of people pay lots more taxes and we're still -- oh, and we're gutting medicare in obamacare, we're gutting it $716 billion, so the seniors will have less health care. oh, i k
in my apartment here in washington, d.c., proudly i do. i would encourage support of this and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: mr. speaker, we have no further requests for speakers on our side of the aisle to support this legislation. i know almost all democrats that i've talked to think it's a good bill. i've urged the others to join with them in supporting it. i think it's a worthwhile piece of legislation. it's a small step but it's a step in the right direction and it will clarify some issues that still need to be clarified. so let's get this done and in pursuit of that objective, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: i also want to urge everybody to support h.r. 6582, the small, modest energy efficiency bill, that will save some jobs. certainly want to thank the members of the senate,
. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> i rise to recognize the outstanding service of jay johnson of the department of defense in navigating a wide range of important legal issues, he's been an invaluable partner to the house aarped services committee. over the last four years he advised the committee on numerous national security challenges including cyberwarfare, counterterrorism operation the legal boundaries in the conflict against al qaeda, and detainee operations worldwide. he was integral tour efforts to reform military commissions for those -- with those accused of planning and executing the 9/11 attacks will be tried. he's created briefings on don't ask, don't tell, efforts to combat sexual assault in the military, changes to the combat exclusion policy, the member of the joint chiefs staff and the withdrawal of troops from iraq. there's been no shortage of difficult and controversial issues. he's always approached them intell
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